The Perovskite Age

We begin our journey at the advent of the Stone Age. Human-like species, or hominids, aren’t able to run as fast as their prey, nor do they stand an earthly chance of surviving brawls with other predators. They can, however, yield a much more powerful weapon – their intelligence. They learn to utilise stone tools in order to gain a technological advantage, and they learn to yield stone weapons in order to exercise their superiority over other species. Here commences the birth of civilisation.

Fast-forward three and a half million years and we arrive at the Bronze Age. The Bronze Age is considered to have begun during the fourth millennium BC with the onset of the production of bronze – an alloy consisting of a copper majority with a supplement of tin. By combining the attributes of two metals, the homo sapiens concocts a metal with strength and durability unmatched by any other material at the time. Stone certainly cannot contend.

Fast-forward another mere three millennia and we arrive at the Iron Age. The Iron Age is considered to have begun during the early first millennium BC and to have ended by the Middle Ages. Iron, although simpler in structure than bronze, is a more difficult metal to extract from its ore. Nonetheless, the reward is immense. The discovery of steel, one of the strongest common materials on the planet, provides human civilisation with another rung in technological advancement.

This is the three-age system. Some say that we currently live in a fourth age – the Silicon Age. Nowadays we can scarcely step in any direction without being in close proximity to a silicon transistor – an essential component of every electronic circuit and which exists in masses of a few billions at a time in a smartphone.

Silicon extends its range of applications to photovoltaic technology. Silicon is by far the most prevalent material in solar cells, the building blocks of solar panels. However, a newer material, perovskite, has captivated the interest of many researchers in the field of semiconductor electronics. Its promisingly high efficiency could put an end to the days of silicon solar cells. For solar cells, could this be the start of the Perovskite Age?

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Winter Is Coming…

Waking up last Wednesday, I took a glance outside to witness a featureless, gleaming expanse of white encasing the whole street. A minute, ashy substance was descending from the sky, and I knew immediately what this meant – the apocalypse had arrived. Yellowstone had finally erupted, and was scattering volcanic debris across the entire globe. If we didn’t die from building collapse, our lungs would surely suffer from particulates suspended in the air… Alternatively, it was snowing, but that’s such a rare event that I think I can exclude the possibility.

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The Driving Force of All Nature

I come forth to deliver a warning. The food you eat, the beverages you drink, the liquid running from all your taps – they contain the odourless, colourless chemical dihydogren monoxide. This chemical is known to be the basis of many adverse health effects, including gene mutation and cell lysis. It is home to countless pathogens and it allows the transmission of numerous diseases across the globe, yet we still expose ourselves to it every day. It has been and still continues to be a major cause of environmental erosion and the destruction of millions of residences worldwide.

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