Draughts of the Stars

In our last post we took a glimpse at auroras in the making – a spectacular light show staged not by a Roman deity sadly, but by the solar wind. Today we will see where this solar wind originates from (the Sun, unsurprisingly) and see how the draughts of the stars yield the lights of the skies.

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Lights of the Skies

Last week we walked through the gallery of the universe to observe the majestic broad strokes found strewn across the canvas of interstellar space. This week we’re going to wander slightly closer to home, and take a look at the beautiful natural lights put on for us by our very own skies. However, they do get a little bit of help from a certain life-giving star, not to mention a lot of physics…

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Hawking Radiation

Alright this will be my final post on black holes, I promise. Unless you want more, that is? Actually that’s a silly question, of course you’d like more. But unfortunately you’re not getting any, so make sure you savour this one. It’s going to be… astronomical… (I’ll see myself out).

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She’s So Lovell-y

Children, gather round. I hope you’re sitting comfortably because it’s time for another of Harvey’s storytime posts. Lean back on a deckchair and take your eyes to the skies. This week, we’re exploring the hidden wonders of the universe.

A few weeks ago, myself and Yanhao partook on a school trip to a little place called Jodrell Bank. There rests one of the world’s largest radio telescopes – the Lovell Telescope, a whopping 76.2m in diameter. Now, you may be wondering, “Why do they need a 76.2m diameter telescope to listen to Classic FM? Is the sound quality really that much better?”. The answer is yes, the sound quality is a lot better, but fortunately that’s not what scientists are using the telescope for. No, at Jodrell Bank, they’re listening out for the music of the cosmos…

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North and South

There was a time in primary school when we were first introduced to the curious object that is the bar magnet. Instead of paying attention to actual mechanics behind magnetism, more often than not were we competing to see who could force the north poles of two magnets to touch each other. But what these lessons had taught us are that magnets are indeed curious objects.

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